Value and the Market’s (Dis)Order: Market Prices as a Theological Problem in Patristic Thought and the Value Theory of Peter of John Olivi

Ida Simonsson Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 2, no. 2 (2022): 85-100 AbstractThis article analyzes prices and value as constituting a theological problem in early and medieval Christian thought. First, it looks at the patristic critique of wealth and market prices and shows that such critique was rooted in a concern with aContinue reading “Value and the Market’s (Dis)Order: Market Prices as a Theological Problem in Patristic Thought and the Value Theory of Peter of John Olivi”

Volatility and Foresight: Risk, Derivatives, and Kierkegaard’s Christian Discourses

Andrew Swann Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 2, no. 2 (2022): 67-83 AbstractThis essay explores the use of financial instruments and the way such instruments discipline actors to envisage time, the future, and its possibilities. Through the construction of a contrastive theological account of futurity, using the Christian Discourses of the Danish theologian-philosopherContinue reading “Volatility and Foresight: Risk, Derivatives, and Kierkegaard’s Christian Discourses”

The Logic of Wasteful Production

Tong Zhang Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 2, no. 2 (2022): 51-66 AbstractEconomic neoliberalism promises social efficiency with self-interested participants and free competition. This doctrine is challenged by the extensive production of wasteful goods and services in the contemporary West. By studying three types of wasteful production—conspicuous goods, conspicuous profession, and information overproduction—Continue reading “The Logic of Wasteful Production”

Economics and Theological Ethics: An Environmental Economist Replies to his Queen

H. Spencer Banzhaf Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 1, no. 2 (2021): 193-215 AbstractRecently, some theological ethicists have criticized modern economics for offering a rival theology that undermines an appreciation for creation and God’s gifts. In their view, through the logic of opportunity cost, economics substitutes a tragic world of scarcity for God’sContinue reading “Economics and Theological Ethics: An Environmental Economist Replies to his Queen”

The Amateur Economist: Abraham Kuyper and Economics

Joost Hengstmengel Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 1, no. 2 (2021): 137-158 AbstractOne of the earliest attempts at formulating a systematic religious approach to economics was undertaken by neo-Calvinists, first in the Netherlands, and later in the twentieth century also in the Anglo-Saxon world. While their approach to and achievements in economics haveContinue reading “The Amateur Economist: Abraham Kuyper and Economics”

The Triangular Game between Autocrats, Clerics, and the Military: An Application to Muslim Countries

Emmanuelle Auriol / Jean-Philippe Platteau / Thierry Verdier Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 1, no. 2 (2021): 159-191 AbstractIn order to elucidate the revival of religion in the Muslim countries, we must not only understand the spread of puritan interpretations of the faith (as they have permeated movements running from Muslim Brothers toContinue reading “The Triangular Game between Autocrats, Clerics, and the Military: An Application to Muslim Countries”

The Liberty of the Will in Theology Permits the Liberated Markets of Liberalism

Deirdre Nansen McCloskey Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 1, no. 1 (2021): 81-108 AbstractThe Abrahamic doctrine of liberty of the will can allow liberalism in the economy. For a century or so in academic theology, and stretching back to the early church and such revivals as the Radical Reformation, numerous Christian writers haveContinue reading “The Liberty of the Will in Theology Permits the Liberated Markets of Liberalism”

To What Ends for Theology-Oriented Economic Policymaking?

Robert C. Tatum Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 1, no. 1 (2021): 65-80 AbstractThis paper explores the need for theology-oriented economic policymaking, as well as its possible sacred and secular ends. To facilitate this exploration, America’s Social Gospel movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries is examined as a historical caseContinue reading “To What Ends for Theology-Oriented Economic Policymaking?”

A Contractual Look at the Role of Religion in the Stability of Marriage

Feler Bose Journal of Economics, Theology and Religion, vol. 1, no. 1 (2021): 45-63 AbstractThis paper uses a modified contractual model to study the role of religion—via entry and exit costs—in shaping preferences for getting and staying married. The religions that are analyzed are two “collective” religions: Judaism and Christianity. The paper takes a historicalContinue reading “A Contractual Look at the Role of Religion in the Stability of Marriage”